The end of thermal cars in 2035, a front-line deal for the European Union

[ad_1]

While the European Union members had to agree on the end of the thermal car in 2035, the discussions between different countries on the night of 28-29 June were tumultuous. These tensions are symptomatic of many questions regarding the feasibility of this project and thus led to an appearance agreement with many conditions.

This deal maintains the core purpose, but there are exceptions that complicate things a bit.

Europe reached an agreement at midnight to ban the sale of so-called thermal cars by 2035. However, everything was not easy. European ministers would ban the sale of all new cars with internal combustion engines in a little over 10 years. But Europeans are actually so divided on the issue that they have finally reached a binding front agreement. This deal maintains the core purpose, but there are exceptions that complicate things a bit. For example, sports car manufacturers will be able to continue selling gasoline engines for another 5 years. It’s called a Ferrari change. The Germans have also imposed that we keep the door open to gasoline if we manage to develop new less polluting synthetic fuels by 2035. Therefore, it is a prohibition with many conditions.

Also read

It’s hard to come to a consensus because this thread shows all the difference between the truth of speaking, goodwill, and practice. On paper, everyone is in favor of the fight against global warming. But everything gets more complicated when you have to reach the goal and move on to the solutions to get there. While banning the sale of new gasoline-powered cars by 2035 sounds great on paper, it brings with it many problems in real life. What will be the economic impact for those who produce cars or parts for gasoline engines? What will be the impact on our European producers? There are also many unanswered questions. Are we sure we’ll have enough batteries whose manufacture won’t be too polluting? Can we guarantee that there are enough charging stations and that the price of electric vehicles will decrease? Is it good for the planet to force us to buy new cars and trash cars that still work because they’re not electric? When you have to commit, you realize it’s complicated. Thus, discussions become stifled or create tension.

What will be the economic impact for those who produce cars or parts for gasoline engines?

We could have done differently. The truth is that if we don’t put pressure on companies, create regulatory tension, and there’s no form of coercion, companies will want to take their time, even if their goal is not to pollute us. If we want things to move, we must create constraints that force us to act. But if we force them to act on ideology, forget to bring facts and figures, and don’t objectify the discussion, we inevitably create tension. We’ve taken this issue back a bit. We started by banning the sale of thermal cars in 2035 and only then wondered if it was realistic. Because it really doesn’t, it’s hard to agree.

David Barroux

DFind Economical Decryption